influence of of dental caries on disease in early life
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influence of of dental caries on disease in early life by Hugh T. Ashby

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Published by s.n. in S.l .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Dentistry.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementH. T. Ashby.
ContributionsClinical Society of Manchester.
The Physical Object
Pagination9p. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19014827M

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  Dental caries is a preventable disease, and it can be stopped and even potentially reversed during its early stages. People remain susceptible to the disease throughout their lives. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate why many children are suffering from dental caries by reviewing published reports on prevalence, process, risk factors Cited by: Consistent with the developmental origins of health and disease paradigm, early-life exposures may increase caries risk through biological early-life programming. 8 Reframing prevention of dental caries in terms of developmental origins of health and disease may provide novel targets for prevention before disease onset but are hampered by a lack of prospective studies. Conclusions: Environmental rather than genetic factors drive dental caries risk and arise as early as prenatal life.   1. Introduction. Dental caries is a multifactorial-induced infectious disease. In many countries, dental caries is a major oral health problem in children [].Various factors may contribute to the development of dental caries in children, such as the frequent consumption of sugar-containing snacks or beverages [2,3,4,5,6], less frequent tooth brushing habits, parental smoking [7,8,9,10], and Cited by:

  In the Australian survey 39% of year-olds and 60% of year-olds had experience of dental caries. 20 In a UK survey of year-old Cited by: 5.   Dental caries is a process which occurs on any tooth surface in the oral cavity where dental plaque is allowed to develop over a period of by: 4. Diet, nutrition and the prevention of dental diseases (PDF 26P) Oral health is related to diet in many ways, for example, nutritional influences on craniofacial development, oral cancer and oral infectious diseases. Dental diseases impact considerably on self esteem and quality of life . Dental caries (tooth decay) is one of the most highly prevalent disease around the world affecting a significant proportion of the population. Dental caries may take place on any tooth surface in the oral cavity where dental plaque is allowed to develop over a period of by:

Dental caries is increasing among the elderly (Chapter 19). This phenomenon may be attributed to the fact that more adults are retaining their teeth through the life span. Studies show that the elderly are experiencing dental caries at a greater rate than children. 49 Certain risk factors are associated with aspects of aging, including xerostomia. First published in , Dental Caries: The Disease and Its Clinical Management has become the leading resource on cariology. In this highly anticipated new edition, the editors maintain the same focus on high-level coverage of the disease etiology and process, clinical management best-practice, and wider public health issues connected with dental caries management, including an enhanced focus Cited by: The book is divided into six main sections: An overview of the disease and its prevalence The caries lesion and its biological determinants Diagnosis Controlling dental caries Operative intervention Caries control in special populations With contributions from international experts in research and clinical practice, the third edition of Dental Caries is an unrivalled guide to tooth decay, and a must-have resource for undergraduate and postgraduate students in restorative dentistry . Nutrition, for example, influences cranio-facial development, oral cancer and oral infectious diseases. Dental diseases related to diet include dental caries, developmental defects of enamel, dental erosion and periodontal disease. The nutrition transition is a relevant example on how common risks influence public health, including oral health.